Ready Player One 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Review

Capturing the awe and power of video games has long eluded Hollywood, whether it’s adaptation of the games themselves or bottling the culture’s essence. “Wreck-It Ralph” came close, but it’s fair to disregard its efforts because it was animated, hence it was able to replicate the visual absurdity and calm in the chaos sometimes in video games. With a book, that I’m assume is page soaked in pop-culture references over two decades, Steven Spielberg appears to have cracked the code.

Instead of feeling like you’re watching someone play a video game at the arcade, Spielberg immerses viewers in the OASIS, a worldwide massive multiplayer experience at the center of “Ready Player One” The OASIS is where anyone can be anything they want to be, with digital avatars ranging from humanoids to iconic media characters. Before people can inhabit their digital body, they have to plug into these free-hanging set-ups that look like someone plugging themselves into “The Matrix” via a full-body suit, Nintendo power gloves and a VR viewer attachment. It seems like a hassle and unnecessary expense, but the alternative, reality, is a lot less exciting.

Ready Player One 4K Ultra HD

Wade Watts (Sheridan) lives in Columbus, Ohio in 2045. He lives in the slums of Columbus, which is filled with metallic clutter like older cars and technological trash. Most of its inhabitants take up residence in dilapidated trailer park trailers stacked on top of each other like a white trash Kowloon Walled City. With no parents and no real-life friends, or even a job, Watts retreats every day to the OASIS in a makeshift gaming room he’s carved out of the surrounding scrap heap.

Inside the OASIS, he and other players, which make up his clan, are on the hunt for the ultimate Easter egg. The creator of OASIS, the late James Halliday (Mark Rylance), has hidden several clues throughout the game that lead to three keys. If you find all the keys, you get full ownership of OASIS, as well as the money and stock attached to it. But it’s more than just a dream of riches and power; it’s a dream of escaping the rat hole that Watts perceives he lives in. Of course he’s not the only one on the hunt for these keys. An evil corporate shadow looms over the OASIS and looks to control the one thing used by billions.

Despite flirting with the risk of saturating the film with too much exposition, “Ready Player One” cleverly layers it over action sequences and visual feasts. Spielberg, who’s created some of the most iconic figures, creatures, and heroes for the silver screen, handles everything with a master stroke. Watts is immediately sympathetic and likeable; his friends and cohorts are equally the same despite their minimal screen time. The motivations of Watt and his journey rarely get muddied, but because so much of the film’s focus is on him, we lose sight of some of the great characters accompanying him.

There’s the rushed love interest, Art3mis (Cooke). She’s pigeonholed more than a few times, but the moments where her character can demonstrate personality that isn’t cliché are some of her best moments. She’s able to breathe a little, whether it’s solo or complimenting Watt’s introverted personality, but it’s certainly not enough once we realize how powerful she truly is. The movie’s villain, played by Ben Mendelsohn, is an intern that works his way up the corporate ladder looking to cash in on someone else’s idea and then abuse the power he’s obtained. He’d be more menacing if he didn’t pass off so many of his bad guys duties to lackeys and spent his time relegating the fun missions inside the OASIS to a mercenary, played by T.J. Miller.

Ready Player One 4K Ultra HD

Character flaws aside, Spielberg puts viewers in this vast digital landscape without ever making it feel overwhelmingly and at times he even makes it feel intimate. The films has a chaotic “Mad Max”-style car race that smacks viewers with dozens of pop-culture references and has a more focused homage in the form of a Stanley Kubrick playground that I dare not spoil. Both work because they not only cater to different tastes, but are easily digestible for those who might not pick up on every reference. However Spielberg neglected the real-world that the OASIS was created in.

What global crisis is happening or has happened that’s led to Columbus looking like a third world country? Why does it seem like Watts and the head of an evil corporate entity is only a couple of blocks away at all times? Why is the resistance to this evil corporate on such a micro-level as opposed to the global scale it seems to be inside the OASIS. We feel like we’re trapping inside Ohio any time we’re not zipping through the OASIS. It sometimes minimizes the film’s plight.

Luckily you won’t have too much time to nitpick the film’s shortcomings because of how brisk it moves, even within the time span of nearly two and a half hours. For all its faults, and there’s quite a few that I have and haven’t listed, “Ready Player One” had me grinning like a child at the movies for the first time. At times I felt like I was picking up a video game controller for the first time, waking up early on a Saturday morning for cartoons or sneaking out of my room past my bedtime to watch a bad cheesy movie. For those who don’t feel that sense of nostalgia, certainly you’ll feel young again.

Note: the 4K portion of the review is written by Brad Sturdivant

4K ULTRA HD BLU-RAY REVIEW

Video: READY PLAYER ONE seems like it was made for the 4K format since all of the Oasis scenes are CGI and the reality scenes typically have only hints of color.  For the reality scenes, those hints of color really stand out on the 4K, giving the scenes a nice, crisp look.  For the Oasis, every scene gets a touch of an upgrade in clarity and color definition, making everything look slightly more realistic when compared to the Blu-ray.  The Blu-ray also looks great, but the 4K takes everything up a notch and delivers a very nice transfer.

Audio: The Dolby Atmos track is what you’ll want to brag about when it comes to READY PLAYER ONE.  There are many scenes in the movie (the car race being the most obvious) where you can almost feel things overhead.  As King Kong was jumping on buildings, my walls were shaking.

This title was reviewed using a Samsung UBD-K8500 with a Sony XBR75X850C TV.

There are no 4K exclusive special features, but it does come with a Blu-ray of the film, which has the following special features:

Game Changer: Cracking the Code (57:20): This is the in-depth feature Spielberg wants you to see so he doesn’t have to do a commentary.  This is much better than most making-of featurettes and covers just about everything you want to know.

Effects For a Brave New World (24:40): The special effects get their own feature.

Ernie and Tye’s Excellent Adventure (12:00): Ernest Cline and star Tye Sheridan talk about the movie and their experiences with an awkward exchange.

High Score: Endgame (10:05): Spielberg talks about Alan Silvestri’s score and how Silvestri became involved.

Level Up: Sound For the Future (8:05): The sound gets its own feature.

The ’80’s: You’re The Inspiration (5:40): The 80’s are a central theme in the film and here Ernest Cline shows up to talk about the references as well as the ones that didn’t make the cut.

Click 4K Ultra HD to read more of our 4K reviews.  And you can also follow us on Instagram (@flix66pics) to see previews of our upcoming 4K reviews and more pics of the packaging.

OVERALL 4
    MOVIE REVIEW
    BLU-RAY REVIEW

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